Program

Friday • May 16, 2014

2:30-9:30pm | REGISTRATION Conference materials pick up at Queens Museum OE Registration Area

OPEN HOUSES

Please note that check in at the OE Registration Area at the Queens Museum is not needed before attending Open House events offsite. This check in is only needed before attending on-site events at the Queens Museum campus.

Please note that there will be Guided Group Tours available that will each stop at 3-4 of the Open Houses. Open House Tours require pre-registration, which is now closed.

8:30-10:00am | Immigrant Movement International: Morning Exercise Class

Immigrant Movement International, (IMI) is a community space that hosts a variety of free experimental educational workshops facilitated by both artists and community members serving the needs of local immigrants. IMI acts as a think tank for those interested in creating a more humane and dignified legal and economic reality for migrants in the future. Join Veronica Ramirez of Immigrant Movement International for a morning exercise dance class. This class is one of IMI most popular workshops; it is not your average zumba, jazzercise, or aerobics class. Vero choreographs energetic dances to a variety of Latin American rhythms from Mexican Banda to 80s Spanish rock ballads, and uses dance to raise awareness about health issues as well as build community and empower women in our community. Come dance and meet the amazing women of IMI. Pre-registration is required. Registration is now closed. 108-59 Roosevelt Ave, Flushing, NY 11368

10:00-12:00pm  | Aperture: Photo-based Social Practice
A discussion of socially engaged, transdisciplinary, and expanded practices in contemporary photography. 
Aperture, a not-for-profit foundation, connects the photo community and its audiences with the most inspiring work, the sharpest ideas, and with each other—in print, in person, and online. This panel is offered in conjunction with the Spring 2014 issue of Aperture magazine, produced in collaboration with guest editor Susan Meiselas and the Magnum Foundation, which explores how the ground for socially engaged documentary storytelling has radically shifted over the last decade and how photographers might adapt. The panel is co-presented by Aperture Magazine Presents and the Photography, Expanded Initiative of the Magnum Foundation. Moderated by Eliza Gregory, panelists include: Pete Brook, Gemma-Rose Turnbull, Mark Strandquist, and Wendy Ewald. Pre-registration is required. Registration is now closed. Aperture Foundation, 547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor, New York, N.Y. 10001

12:00-2:00pm | Vera List Center for Art and Politics: Making|Meaning
Founded in 1992 and named in honor of the late philanthropist, the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School is dedicated to serving as a catalyst for the discourse on the role of the arts in society and their relationship to the sociopolitical climate in which they are created. Students curate student projects on intention and material. Drawing from programs across Parsons, the exhibition Making|Meaning examines how ideas are translated into objects, and what agency the material itself has in this process. In an environment of study and learning, what can be gleaned from the process of making itself? What literal and metaphorical qualities do materials convey, and how can projects such as computable fashion or paper architecture be employed in the service of social justice. Every lunch hour, one “Object of the Day” is selected from one hundred, and activated by student companions. For Open Engagement, we will engage with five projects dealing with sustainability, pride, fragmentation, time and revolution. Pre-registration is required. Registration is now closed Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, Parsons The New School for Design, 66 Fifth Avenue (between 12th and 13th Streets)

1:00-3:00pm |  Flux Factory: Artists in Residence Show
Flux Factory is a non-profit art organization and collective that supports and promotes artists and cultural producers through exhibitions, commissions, residencies, and collaborative opportunities.  Flux Factory is guided by its passion to nurture the creative process, while cultivating a global network of peers through resource-sharing and participatory decision-making. On view in our gallery, we will be exhibiting work by the past years residents. The show will highlight the communal nature of the building’s spaces which toe the line between frenzy and control. The show will bring together the interdisciplinary working practices of Flux. To close this annual show we will highlight durational projects on view in an afternoon of time-based Fluxworks. This program will focus on those artists whose practices involve music, dance, movement, sound, video, and more. Join us on May 16th for lunch and a performance. Pre-registration is required. Registration is now closed. 39-31 29th Street, Long Island City, 11101

12:00-4:00pm Open House | 1:00-2:30pm Panel |  ISCP: The Curatorialization of Activism in Art as a Neo-Avant-Garde
International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP) is a leading nonprofit, residency-based contemporary art institution for emerging to mid-career artists and curators from around the world. To advance its core mission of supporting artists in producing and exhibiting a wide range of contemporary artistic approaches, ISCP annually presents a series of innovative exhibitions and public programs both on- and off-site. Since 2008 demonstrations have taken place across North America, Europe and the Middle East. Although these protests occurred for different reasons, they are a resistance to neo-liberalism. Artists have responded by participating in actions and embracing calls for change – are they implicit in this process of Institutionalisation, how does this relate to the neo-avant-garde? Organized by Michael Birchall and Megan Johnston, with presentations from Gregory Sholette, Elissa Blount Moorhead and Arthur Jafa on the theoretical idea of the neo-avant-garde and the practical nature of social practice and the political exhibition. Pre-registration is required. Registration is now closed.
In addition to the panel, ISCP’s gallery and selected resident studios will be open to visitors. As part of Video Bureau’s institutional residency at ISCP, New York-based independent curator Howie Chen travelled to China to research Video Bureau’s archives, resulting in the exhibition The Poplar Tree and Mirror, currently on view.1040 Metropolitan Ave, New York, NY 11211

1:00-3:30pm | The Laundromat Project: Hello, Neighbor!
The Laundromat Project brings art, artists, and arts programming into laundromats and other everyday spaces, thus amplifying the creativity that already exists within communities to build community networks, solve problems, and enhance our sense of ownership in the places where we live, work, and grow. Believing that arts, culture, and creative expression are powerful engines for turning strangers into neighbors, The Laundromat Project’s (The LP) artists will lead participants in a series of creative exercises that explore what it means to be a neighbor. Participants will have an opportunity to visit some of The LP’s partner laundromats along the way. Pre-registration is required. Registration is now closed. Marmy Laundromat, 197 Malcolm X Blvd, Brooklyn, NY 11221

2:30-4:00pm | Creative Time:  Mierle Laderman Ukeles: Seven Work Ballets Discussion and Screening
Since 1974, New York City-based organization Creative Time has collaborated with artists and others to present ambitious art projects in public spaces. This event celebrates the upcoming publication, Mierle Laderman Ukeles: Seven Work Ballets, Ukeles’ first monograph to date. The event will feature an informal discussion between Ukeles and Kari Conte, and a screening of Snow Workers Ballet from 2012. The publication focuses on the artist’s ballet works, and their proposals and realizations in the artist’s words. These large-scale collaborative performances involved workers, trucks and barges and took place between 1983 and 2012 in Givors, Echigo-Tsumari, New York, Pittsburgh, and Rotterdam. This richly illustrated publication includes an interview with Shannon Jackson and Tom Finkelpearl, is edited and contains an essay by Kari Conte and is co-published by Sternberg Press, Kunstverein Amsterdam, Grazer Kunstverein and Krist Gruijthuijsen, in collaboration with Arnolfini and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts. Pre-registration is required. Registration is now closed. 59 East 4th Street, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10003

3:00-5:00pm | Chloë Bass and Sally Szwed (with special guests TBA): FIELD TRIP: Bowling at Jib Lanes.
FIELD TRIP: a series in five adventures of off­site, thematic adventures that will introduce OE participants to eclectic local neighborhood offerings. These activities will provide an amplified social context for conversation beyond the conference format, encouraging deeper and more personal engagement with content. Limited to 18 participants. REGISTER HERE.

3:00-5:00pm | Bibi Calderaro: Walking – Activating the Senses, Expanding the Categories
Threshold: what is it? from life to work; from self to world; from consciousness to non-consciousness; from sentient to inert matter; what separates one “thing” or state from another? Walking in an urban garden can create a more dynamic awareness of these liminal spaces. Walking is an opportunity to nourish our ability to perceive, it aims to find ways to become more attuned to behavior. The Queens Botanical Garden, established in 1939 as backdrop for the World’s Fair, has a little known history of intercultural and inter-species relations. It was also an early adaptor of urban farming, and other environmentally friendly activities. This history will act as metaphor through which the transition from perception and emotion to behavior and knowledge production is explored. Preregistration is necessary. Registration is now closed. Queens Botanical Gardens, 43-50 Main St, New York, NY, 11355

3:00-6:00pm | MoMA @ MoMA Studio: Breathe With Me
Organized by the department of Education at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA Studios are free, interactive spaces offering drop-in programs and artist-led workshops to visitors of all ages. Offered in conjunction with an exhibition or a topic related to modern and contemporary art, MoMA Studios encourage exploration and engagement with art in participatory, creative ways.

Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1948–1988 (May 10, 2014–August 24, 2014), MoMA Studio: Breathe With Me is an interactive space that explores the intersections between art, therapeutic practice, and the ways in which we relate to objects and people through physical encounters. Taking Lygia Clark’s practice as a reference point, the Studio will present a series of drop-in programs, participatory experiences and artist-led workshops that reveal the profound resonance Lygia Clark’s work has had on contemporary artists’ practices. Collaborating artists include Allison Smith, Ricardo Basbaum, Michel Groisman, Stephanie Diamond and others. Pre-registration is required. Registration is now closed. The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building, mezzanine, The Museum of Modern Art, Entrance at 4 West 54 Street, New York, NY 10019

3:00pm-6:00pm | Immigrant Movement International: Meet the Community
Immigrant Movement International, (IMI) is a community space that hosts a variety of free experimental educational workshops facilitated by both artists and community members serving the needs of local immigrants. IMI acts as a think tank for those interested in creating a more humane and dignified legal and economic reality for migrants in the future. Join us to learn about the variety of actions, programs and workshops hosted at IMI and to meet many of our members and teaching artists who make IMI such a rich, committed and creative community. Members of our newly formed Community Council will be present to talk about how the project is transitioning from Tania Bruguera’s leadership to leadership of a council of community users and leaders. Tania Bruguera will be present to share some of the history of the project and conceptualization of IMI as an Useful Art project. Pre-registration is required. Registration is now closed. 108-59 Roosevelt Ave, Flushing, NY 11368

4:00-7:00pm | Queens Museum
The Queens Museum is dedicated to presenting the highest quality visual arts and educational programming for people in the New York metropolitan area, and particularly for the residents of Queens, a uniquely diverse, ethnic, cultural, and international community.

4:00-5:00pm | Art under construction: Working at the new Queens Museum, Adeola Enigbokan
An hour-long discussion between a curator, an artist-in-residence, the director of development and head custodian of the newly renovated Queens Museum, will be facilitated by research artist Adeola Enigbokan, who worked for one day with each participant. How is each employee is adapting to the renovation which doubled the size of the museum? Do commonalities emerge between different life/work experiences? Could the museum be a laboratory for experimenting with alternative ways to live and work? Triangle Room, Queens Museum Artist Studio Wing (the space where the old museum meets the new one. Observers welcome.)

4:00-7:00pm | Queens Museum Studio Residency Program Open Studios
This past August, the Queens Museum launched its Studio Residency Program, welcoming seven artists and one artist team – Juan Betancurth, Onyedika Chuke, Shahab Fotouhi, Caitlin Keogh, Mike Kenney, Jewyo Rhii, Caroline Woolard, and collaborators Filip Olzewski and Bunny Rogers into newly-built, subsidized studios in the Museum’s north wing.  The idea behind the Residency Program is for the Museum to serve artists and its communities in a new way. The Studio Wing will be open to the public during OE’s Open House. The Studio Wing, New York City Building, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, NY 11368

OE OPENING PROGRAMMING @ Queens Museum

5:00-6:30pm | Meet and Greet: Speed Ideating, Ariana Jacob
SPEED IDEATING is an activity for quickly getting in deep with a bunch of new people. This rousing and intimate event invites Open Engagement participants to share their ideas and get a feel for each other through a swift series of 2 min discussions. Come get to know the people with whom you will be sharing the weekend through a round of fast, facilitated conversation about how you experience art, work & life. Queens Museum Atrium

OPEN A.I.R. WORKSHOPS

5:00-6:30pm | Writing for Socially Engaged Art
How do we write about art that may not look like art on first glance? Socially engaged and participatory projects are a major current in artistic practice today, meanwhile, art critics frequently remain conflicted about how to describe and assess these new projects, which are often designed for and with a specific community, and are durational, process-based, and lack any object as its final product.
 What are the stakes for writing about social practice? Must new languages be developed? What do those languages sound like and who is being addressed? This panel discussion looks at new directions in writing about social practice from diverse perspectives. Panelists include Sandra de la Loza, Juliana Driever and Christopher Howard. The conversation will be moderated by Chelsea Haines.Co-organized by Guernica, Open Engagement and the Queens Museum.This session is generously supported by the Queens Museum Open A.I.R. Artist Services Program. Open A.I.R. is made possible by a generous grant from the Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund. Additional support provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.  Queens Museum Theater

7:30pm | Opening remarks and conference overview 
Queens Museum Atrium

8:30-11:00pm | Conference opening mixer + Getting to know You(Tube) Open DJ session
Getting to know You(Tube) founders Crystal Baxley and Stefan Ransom invite you to bring the noise by collectively DJ-ing the first night of Open Engagement. After opening remarks remarks on Friday night, share one of your favorite music videos on YouTube as a way to introduce yourself to fellow conference goers, and maybe start a dance party in the process. Queens Museum Atrium

Card-Carrying Feminist Photobooth
CCF is a participatory project that seeks to capture all the faces of feminism. Our intention is to create an ever-expanding collection of portraits celebrating the beautiful individuality and powerful togetherness that is feminism. CCF consists of an open print edition of “Feminist” cards, and a website displaying portraits of self-identified feminists. While the cards themselves exist as objets d’art, they also act as props in the photo project. Participants are invited to upload snapshots of themselves and their friends posing with the cards. These are then published online at cardcarryingfeminists.com and to social media. Queens Museum Atrium

Saturday • May 17, 2014

10:00am- 12:00pm | PARALLEL PROGRAMMING

LIFE/WORK
Edgar Arceneaux, 
New Financial Architectures for Creative Communities

What does a more just and equitable financial architecture that reflects the collective aims and values of today’s creative community look like? I figure the best way to think about what creative people and communities need tomorrow is to understand directly what we are all doing today. Viscusi Gallery, NY Hall of Science

Marisa Jahn, Studio REV- The NannyVan
Created by Marisa Jahn (Studio REV-), artist-in-residence with The National Domestic Workers Alliance, The NannyVan is a bright orange vehicle whose pull-out table, colorful design, and carpeted walls/sound booth convenes domestic workers, artists, media-makers, and parents to produce new tools to “accelerate the movement for domestic worker rights.” On Saturday, Studio REV- will lead a workshop that draws from lessons learned through the NannyVan. Participants will walk away with new co-design tools and frameworks for fostering open-ended and sustainable participation. In addition, The NannyVan will be present throughout OE, providing opportunities for participants to help create humorous content for the NannyVan App, a public art + know-your-rights app for domestic workers — accessible by any kind of phone.  Queens Museum Theater

PANORAMA
Green Map System and Hibridos Collective
Jammin’ with Green Map for a Just and Resilient NYC
Participants will learn about the Queens DiverCity Map and Green Map’s icons, resources and mobile tools; chart sites in the Panorama of NYC with traditional mapmaking tools and new technologies; explore how maps can be used as tools to advocate for social change and share “green ways of being.”

WATERSHED
Matthew Friday and Greg Sholette
Everything is Downstream: A political ecology of New York’s watershed
A panel/ installation that uses the techniques of political ecology/economy to address the modes of living and working that are producing and produced by New York City’s watershed. Join Bonnie Ora Sherk, the founder and director of A Living Library. and author Linda Weintraub as well as activists, citizens, municipal authorities and scientists to rethink agencies and alliances.

IMMIGRANT MOVEMENT INTERNATIONAL
Meta Local Collaborative with James Rojas
Latino Urbanism: Shaping US Public Spaces through Imagination and Culture
This two-part workshop will explore the ways that people shape their environments to serve cultural, emotional, and social needs. Through a presentation and a bike ride around Corona, participants will consider the role of immigrants in transforming the use and character of neighborhood spaces. Please note that while this workshop is open to all participants, a bike is needed for the second portion of the workshop. If you are from out of town or do not own a bike we recommend you use this site to rent one locally HERE.

OPEN PLATFORM

12:00-1:00pm | Open Platform Lectures: Labor focus

Sarah Barnard, How Do You Know
A brief presentation about the How Do you Know Project (a prompt-based installation that investigates the patriarchal construct that is the gender binary & the ways in which self-identification is confined by the limitations of language) + an opportunity for attendees to contribute their responses.

Bernard Klevickas, True Cost of Labor
What is the true cost of labor? Art fabrication straddles an odd line between art production and manual labor. The business strives to keep labor costs as low as possible. This in turn creates a hierarchy within the factory of young artists burdened with debt from art school, craftspeople with developed skills and lower paid immigrant workers. All are paid to make art for commercially successful artists. Should the labor involved be higher value than non art making labor? I intend to discuss my experience within this hierarchy, and how my values of it changed during my time employed.

Melinda Guillen, Temporality and Labor; Feminist Issues in Social Practice
Melinda Guillen will discuss temporality and labor as feminist issues in social practice. She will explore theoretical notions of time, affect and collaboration in a reflective presentation of her work with the Los Angeles-based collaborative CamLab and artists Suzanne Lacy and Laurie Jo Reynolds.

1:00- 5:00pm | Open Platform

1:00pm-1:10pm |Maggie Ginestra and Michael Stasny, SUMPTUARY
Having freshly closed a 5-week residency at MINT gallery in Atlanta (3/20 – 4/21, 2014), SUMPTUARY artists Mike Stasny and Maggie Ginestra will reflect on highlights and challenges of the experience in a slideshow format, as well as self-prescribe new ways to support SUMPTUARY’s next incarnation.

1:10pm-1:20pm |Taryn Cowart and Corbin LaMont, Day Job
Day Job is a publication by Taryn Cowart and Corbin LaMont. It is a collection of work from contemporary artists, designers, and writers about making work and making a living.

1:20pm-1:30pm | Sonya Darrow, Artist in Residence at Goodwill
Sonya started the residency program 3 yrs ago in Iowa; continues to work on making it sustainable. She’s currently working with Goodwill NY and building case studies in other Goodwill communities about the role of an artist in its structure. The artist’s role takes on the mission, impacting the lives of its shoppers to those who face barriers to independence. Sonya will discuss the beginning stages of this program and the paths it took from community organizer to artist-teacher.

1:30pm-1:40pm | John Hulsey, Foreclosure Resistance, Multimedia Practice
This presentation explores intersections between interdisciplinary art practice and community organizing, addressing questions of home and shelter when they are under massive threat of dispossession by looking at several projects made within the anti-displacement movement in Boston — performance actions in foreclosed homes, media projects in sites of struggle.

1:40pm-1:50pm | Helen Smith, The Lavender ProjectIs it possible for art as a social process to influence how an organization responds to economic and cultural change? This question is explored in relation to The Lavender Project (2013), an artwork made in collaboration with the community surrounding Woodend Barn, a rural arts centre in the North East of Scotland.

1:50pm-2:00pm | Jody Wood, Healing Identity
Jody Wood will address OE’s life/work theme as it relates to ways in which identity can be entangled with one’s economic worth, and the lack of support systems for those who fall out of the usual channels of production and consumption. Wood will present her two recent community-based projects: Spoken Stage (2012, collaboration with So Yeon Park) with aging communities in the rapidly developing city of Seoul, Korea, and Beauty in Transition (2013) with homeless patrons of a Day Shelter in Denver, Colorado.

2:00pm-2:10pm | Dylan Gauthier and Todd Lester: Sunview Luncheonette vs Lanchonete.org
A presentation on the Sunview Luncheonette a member-based social space, located in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, founded by Dylan Gauthier (with other members) and Lanchonete.org, a project for a social space and residency in the center of São Paulo, Brazil founded by Todd Lester.

2:10pm-2:20pm | Daniel Koff, The Path: Fall of the Pemberton Mill
The Path: Fall of the Pemberton Mill uses interpretive signage and immersive video to contextualize the largest industrial disaster in Massachusetts history within an augmented reality city, calling into question the value of life and work in an industrial economy.

2:20pm-2:30pm | Millie Cattlin and Joseph Leunig Norster, These are The Projects we do together
These are The Projects we do together will discuss their design practice and a number of recent projects that relate directly to the theme of Life/Work. This will include an overview of Testing Grounds, a temporary project occupying a 24,000sq. ft. vacant site in the city of Melbourne, Australia.

3:20pm-3:30pm | Martin Rosengaard, Wooloo
Wooloo’s Human Hotel in NYC provides free private housing for visiting cultural workers traveling with children. During Open Engagement 2014, the Human Hotel project will accommodate out-of-town presenters traveling with children in the homes of private New Yorkers. Additionally, Wooloo will organize and personally run a daycare unit at the Queens Museum open to all conference attendees with kids.  Wooloo’s contribution to Open Engagement 2014 addresses a primary need at the conference, as well as explores the ways in which areas of support and cooperation are essential to allow for structures of full participation in society.

3:30pm-3:40pm | Laura Napier, Group Behavior
Drawing on her archive of video, photography, and text documenting crowds and crowd interventions, artist Laura Napier will locate social cultures of New York, showing how where we live, work, and play affect how we move through space.

3:40pm-3:50pm | Amy Spiers, Creative dissensus: altering the realm of the possible
If we imagine the praxis of art is to generate “the destabiling action that produces dissensus about what is sayable and thinkable in the world”, as Ranciere does, then how are artists realising this?

3:50pm-4:00pm | Colleen Sheehy, Plains Art Museum, Defiant Gardens for Fargo-Moorhead
Colleen Sheehy, Director of Plains Art Museum, will discuss a long-term initiative, ”Defiant Gardens for Fargo-Moorhead,” which aims to increase urban vitality and beauty through artist-led public art gardens that take a multitude of forms and engage varied stakeholders.

4:00pm-4:10pm | Letitia Fernandez Ivins, Project Willowbrook
This will be a presentation and frank conversation about Project Willowbrook’s iterative cultural asset mapping and public engagement process whose experimental approach and artist-driven format led to unlikely discoveries that deepened community development.

4:10pm- 4:20pm Anna Lise Jensen, Fjellerup i Bund & Grund
A performative panel, organized by Anna Lise Jensen, that takes into account the feedback of locals in the depopulated, coastal town of Fjellerup, Denmark, on her project Fjellerup i Bund & Grund.  With participating project artists: Julia Whitney Barnes, Alyssa Casey, Monica Carrier, Jo Q. Nelson and Christine Sciulli.

4:20pm-4:30pm| Alana Hunt, On the necessity of art-work-ing
Alana Hunt will put forward some ideas on the necessity of art-work-ing. The discussion will focus not so much on her art work, but the ways in which art has worked over the last 5 years in Indian occupied Kashmir & the remote East Kimberley region of Australia. Central to this process of art-work-ing is the idea of necessity, which sits at the heart of both art and life, in radically contingent and subjective ways. Yet sometimes what we most need is that which might appear unnecessary. And here lies the beautiful irony in the ways that art works.

4:30pm-4:40pm | Craig Shillitto, Proyecto Paladar
Proyecto Paladar, a cultural exchange of chefs and diners, explored attitudes toward labor, food, politics. Facing one another across the table, the universal familiarity of a shared meal provided the basis for trading stories as Cubans and Americans cooked and broke bread together.

4:40pm-4:50pm | Manuel Martagon, Cocina Poblanysima: Something was missing in the recipe
Cocina Poblanysima was a compilation of recipes from Mexican cooks working in NY kitchens. Unable to actually complete the book, Martagon had to adapt his project drastically. In this presentation the artist reflects on the blind spots around projects related to labor and immigrant communities.

4:50pm-5:00pm | Laura Curry, Rest Stop Bike Repair Shop
Rest Stop Bike Repair Shop is a mobile community engagement and broadcast station. The bike trailer is designed for dialogic actions, which are broadcast via a built in sound system, calling attention to issues associated with the everyday occurrence of moving from place to place.

12:30-2:00pm | LUNCHTIME CONVERSATION SERIES

Please note, there are limited spaces in the Lunch Discussion Series sessions and sign up is required. To sign up, please follow this link to reserve a spot:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/oe-2014-lunchtime-conversation-series-tickets-11006732433

Chloe Bass
Lunch with Wrong Criticism Magazine

Let’s make some false comparisons. If we call a socially engaged project a good performance/painting/meal, what might that mean? This casual chat invites you to bring in the lens(es) of your expertise – appropriate and inappropriate – to assess how and when we know that socially engaged work is working. Wrong Criticism Magazine is an as-yet unrealized conceptual project by artist Chloë Bass. The magazine invites experts from one field to criticize work in a different field, using the tools and parameters of their initial expertise. Results of this conversation will be shared online. Viscusi Gallery 1, NY Hall of Science

Abigail Satinsky
Is social practice gentrifying community arts?

Rick Lowe of Project Row Houses posed this question in conversation with Nato Thompson at this year’s Creative Time Summit, addressing how social practice as a contemporary art discipline threatens to obfuscate a legacy of community arts. Participatory contemporary art and social justice driven community arts share many strategies but not always the same goals. Where is it possible to draw distinctions and who is getting left out of the conversation because they do not trade in contemporary art discourse or have an MFA? How can we honor many different legacies and open up the doors to a broader history of grassroots arts organizing that can inform and challenge what we celebrate as social practice art today Viscusi Gallery 2, NY Hall of Science

Marc Mayer
When All Else Fails…
At the moment an institution puts forth a new vision, utilizing contemporary art to shine new light on its collection of antiquities, what are the responsibilities of museums to open up and engage with local artist communities? What type of investment should an institution make in the local arts infrastructure? What are the direct and indirect results of open collaboration? At the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, a new program series works with a different cohort of artists each year. Encouraged to experiment with new ideas, genres, mediums, and technologies, each artist collaborates with the museum, its visitors, and other artists in his or her circle to present an original project.  With a unique focus of presenting Asian American and American perspectives, these projects might draw attention to issues in the local art community and considers how museum of Asian antiquities can serve as cultural transmitter in our world today. Unisphere Gallery 1, 2nd Floor Queens Museum

Robert Blackson
Art and Accountability

By starting from a model of programming that foregrounds urgent questions of local relevance and international significance identified by a neighborhood advisory council comprised of local high school students and civic leaders, Temple Contemporary has been directed to collaboratively address a range of pressing issues from student debt and urban housing, to what makes people happy.  This lunchtime conversation is intended as an open dialogue about accountability in the arts and the ways that we go about achieving it.  In Temple Contemporary’s case we have had to trade in the traditional exhibition model with its predetermined artists, openings, closings and adapt to a new methodology that is more like people of mutual respect having a conversation.  The current project Temple Contemporary is working on is the arrangement of a “funeral” for a home that is about to be demolished in the Mantua neighborhood of Philadelphia. Lab 2, NY Hall of Science

Caroline Woolard
BFAMFAPHD

According to the census, there are more artists than police officers, lawyers, or doctors in this country. Reporting on the census in 2008, The New York Times noticed that “if all artists in America’s workforce banded together, their ranks would be double the size of the United States Army. This discussion will explore the professionalization of artists looking at Caroline Woolard’s facilitation of a group loosely called,  ”BFA MFA PHD” – an emerging initiative that visualizes the number of students graduating with creative degrees, elicits proposals for collective work, and generates dialog and conversation. An exhibition of visualizations on this topic is held in Caroline Woolard and Lika Volkova’s studio at the Queens Museum. Artist Studios, Queens Museum

Nato Thompson & Pablo Helguera
Politics of Socially-Engaged Art

Art works produced in the social realm are often discussed and scrutinized in terms of their ethics, but what about their politics? Ethically-centered critique usually suffers from a lack of definition about whose ethical standards we should work the work against. Would it be easier to identify the political philosophy of a SEA project and discuss it in those terms? Furthermore, can we speak of a collective political bent of this practice, and what are the benefits or downsides of looking at SEA this way? Black Box Theater 1, Queens Theatre in the Park

The Socially Engaged Art Student Summit (Student Summit Lunch) 
Students! Bring your bag lunch and join the Student Summit lunch conversation to talk about what the next wave of socially engaged art will look like. Who are socially engaged art students? What are they doing? Why? What besides debt are they getting from their education? Triangle Room in the Artist Studios Wing, Queens Museum

Elyse Mallouk/Landfill
“The Shift”

Landfill Quarterly chronicles and redistributes ephemera produced by socially engaged projects. On hiatus since its third issue was published in 2012, the online archive and print journal will re-launch at this year’s Open Engagement with the release of Issue 4, “The Shift.” This conversation will address Issue 4 themes including value, labor, and time, and will candidly grapple with the challenges of operating independent, non-lucrative projects alongside financially sustaining work. Elyse Mallouk, Landfill’s founder, and artists Shannon Finnegan and Piero Passacantando, whose projects are featured in the issue, will facilitate the conversation, and copies will be distributed to attendees. Landfill Reading Room-Registration Area, Queens Museum

Marnie Badham
Spectres of Evaluation

Today, the making of art is haunted by spectres of evaluation, with competing claims and judgments about the limits, uses, and value of art. Taking its cue from Hirschhorn’s Spectre of Evaluation (2008), this lunch conversation looks to reconfigure the relationship between artists, art experts, and the “non-exclusive audience.”   What are the spectres (aesthetics, social justice, environment), which haunt the arts? What creative and critical frameworks can be used to explore ‘value’ and ‘values’?  What are the politics of cultural measurement (as opposed to the technical challenges of evaluating socially-engaged practice)? Are the processes of critical reflection, self-determination, or stakeholder accountability effective forms of evaluation? Werwaiss Gallery, 2nd Floor Queens Museum

John Muse
For the Sake of Argument

For a moment let’s assume there are arguments we should be having but aren’t, arguments that deserve to be moved toward the center of social practice, and of Open Engagement.  Then let’s also assume that arguments can be festivals, that arguments can help us discover and clarify matters of deepest concern, build allegiances, strengthen solidarities, make better friends and, yes, even better enemies.  Then what?  Let’s talk not only about the place of argument and dissension in our gatherings, but also about socially engaged modes of argument and dissension. Playful or serious, earnest or impersonal, Oxford rules need not apply.  But which might. Lab 4, NY Hall of Science

Kristin Fleischmann Brewer and Freddie Wills
Creating New Career Paths: Social Work and Social Practice

The lunch will explore The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts and The Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis collaboration as a model for creating job opportunities for social workers, whose career options have become limited as a result of local, state, and federal funding. Can an arts institution help them reach communities whose services have also been affected by these cuts? Queens Museum Theater, 2nd Floor Queens Museum

Craft Mystery Cult: Sonja Dahl
LIfe/Work – A conversation on integrating practices

This lunch session explores a radical toolkit—in what ways can we integrate such alternative modes of work and life into contemporary practices? How do we move from an Art market that favors the buying and selling of discrete objects to a broader, more fluid exchange where the well being of the whole maker and the whole viewer or user is considered? Can there be such a discourse? Do such terms lose gravity in the counter culture and philosophy of contemporary craft ideologies? Through collaborative making,skill-sharing and interdisciplinarity, a new terrain of productivity has emerged. Unisphere Gallery 2, 2nd Floor Queens Museum

1:00-2:00 | Wayfinding: 100 NYC Public Sculptures Installation Tour, Bundith Phunsombatlert

Grab lunch and meet Thai artist Bundith Phunsombatlert who will introduce his installation Wayfinding: 100 NYC Public Sculptures immediately outside the Queens Museum.  The installation is composed of 100 directional signs, each with a drawing of a public sculpture in NYC and the distance (mapped with GPS coordinates) between the source- sculpture and the sign. Viewers participate in this project by experiencing each sculpture, whether through the original works or their representational drawn counterparts, calling attention to the very specific, transformative space between object and audience. Artist will lead those interested to see some public sculptures in Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

2:30-4:30pm | Parallel programming

LIFE/WORK
Family Life & Socially Engaged Art Panel
Where do families and children currently fit into this practice? This session brings together Stephanie Diamond, the Aguilar Family, and Brooklyn Hi-Art Machine to explore on both the personal and institutional level how family life is included, and sometimes excluded, in the discussions, structures, and experience of socially engaged art. Diamond will present on the challenges, complexities and windfalls of her recent attempt to go on a family artist residency.  She will address the question of how artists with families can be welcome into the residency network, as well as how residencies can be more conducive to artists with children. The Aguilar family will share a multi media presentation on the integration of family life and art making. Addressing such issues as education, social activism, health, spirituality, death, alternative vacationing, overcoming fear and navigating uncertainty. Mildred and Oasa will give a presentation on the evolution of The Brooklyn Hi-Art Machine, a public art project. They will discuss how they’ve experienced the complex racial and ethnic relationships in their community as first generation Caribbean American artists amidst gentrification. QM Theater

Living Systems: Residencies for Socially Engaged Art Panel
How are residency programs adapting to support socially engaged artists? How is social practice already embedded in the structure of the residency model? This session will bring together a diverse group of presenters to reflect on these questions and more in relations to intimate, established, and far flung residencies. Emily Ensminger will address creative hospitality, provisioning, resourcefulness and care at Elsewhere’s residency and museum. Emily will investigate the creative practices in the titles House Services, House Keeping, and House(pitality) Curator, as they relate to the daily functions of organizational and community maintenance. Amanda McDonald Crowley will encourage open discussion about problems of programmatic adaptation as she explores the historic focus on studio practice at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, previous community arts efforts there, and current planning to embed social engagement as a core programmatic element. Jon Henry of the Old Furnace Artist Residency will focus on the role of institutional/university in patronage, credentialization, and support for the arts and modes of subversion, parasitism, and solidarity with institutions. Nicole Lattuca will discuss topics of education, architecture, remoteness, experimental communities and revitalizing an economy through art. She will present her project from her current residency at Fogo Island Arts in remote Newfoundland, Canada. Viscusi Gallery, NY Hall of Science

The Pedagogy Group
Teachers Lounge

A peer network of socially engaged art educators, the Pedagogy Group meets regularly to exchange syllabi, readings and classroom experiences with the intention of countering some of the current limitations of conventional art pedagogy. In this spirit we propose the following questions for discussion. Please bring anecdotes, dilemmas, materials, and questions and help us share resources with a broader community.
1. How do you address the seemingly contradictory perspectives of inclusivity vs. criticality and broad experimental inquiry vs. institutional restrictions and ethical concerns?
2. How do you encourage cooperation, collaboration and collectivity within institutions that favor competition?
3. What challenges do you face when addressing issues of white supremacy, patriarchy and class oppression? What skills are needed? Does your institution support your efforts?
4. How do problematic educational issues such as the commercialization and privatization of knowledge, student debt, and university-corporate partnerships play out in your classroom? QM Triangle

PANORAMA
Newton Creek Armada
The Newton Creek Armada and Other Projects
Laura Chipley, Nathan Kensinger and Sarah Nelson Wright will present documentation from recent projects of the Newtown Creek Armada: The Newtown Creek Armada boat pond, Gowanus Voyage — a collaboration with NYU Polytechnic’s robotics lab and Remote Voyages — a multi channel video installation.

Maximilian Auffhammer
New York City Water Supply

Maximilian Auffhammer intends to leverage the museum’s relief map of the New York City Water supply – the most amazing panorama of the city, to visualize the characteristics of the exposed communities and the specific threat from climate change.

WATERSHED
Catalyst Program: Partnerships for Parks, Who’s Waterfront is it Anyway?
Who’s Waterfront is it Anyway? is a presentation and workshop exploring the work of the Catalyst Program. Catalyst uses socially engaged artistic practice as a community development strategy to foster engagement in neighborhood parks and waterfronts and support long term stewardship and programming.

IMMIGRANT MOVEMENT INTERNATIONAL

Betty Marín and Patricia Vazquez
Building Solidarity with spanish-speaking immigrants in Oregon
This panel will focus on how projects by Vazquez and Marin are creating a mediated dialogue between the general population in the state and the growing spanish speaking immigrant community. The projects consider the visibility and invisibility of the population, the role and recognition of undocumented labor in the state, and how these conversations hope to create solidarity within this population and potentially play a role in the larger debate around immigration reform. Oregon is an interesting site as the immigrant community is still largely invisible in what is considered the more “progressive” part of the state, the city of Portland, but growing and more visible in the more rural parts of the state, where opposition is concentrated.

Szu-Han Ho
IMMIGRANT SURVIVAL GUIDE
Immigrants from any country can submit their survival tips to the IMMIGRANT SURVIVAL GUIDE. For Open Engagement 2014, a select group of 10-20 performers in the NYC area will perform survival tips from around the world. #immigrantsurvival @migrantsurvive.

2:30 – 4:30 PM | Chloë Bass and Sally Szwed (with special guests TBA): FIELD TRIP: A visit to the Black Heritage Reference Center.
FIELD TRIP: a series in five adventures is a series of off­site, thematic adventures that will introduce OE participants to eclectic local neighborhood offerings. These activities will provide an amplified social context for conversation beyond the conference format, encouraging deeper and more personal engagement with content. Limited to 20 participants. REGISTER HERE.

6:00pm-7:00pm | /rive collective, COMMotion Tour

Artists Samara Smith, Karen Oh and A.E. Souzis from the /rive collective will give a short guided tour of COMMotion, their augmented reality project exploring NYC through the lens of the daily commute.  Panorama.

5:00-6:30pm | OPEN A.I.R. WORKSHOP

Support for Socially Engaged Art
It is only in recent years that foundations have considered social practice as a funding category.  It comes under a variety of headings including art for social change, socially engaged art, community arts, and so on.  This panel will bring together four of the most active funders in the field to discuss their philosophy and opportunities for artists and organizations. Panelists include Michelle Coffey, Executive Director of the Lambent Foundation, Deborah Fisher, Executive Director of A Blade of Grass Foundation, Judilee Reed, Program Director of the Thriving Cultures Program (Surdna Foundation), and Edwin Torres, Associate Director of the Rockefeller Foundation. The conversation will be moderated by Tom Finklepearl, President and Executive Director of the Queens Museum.
This session is generously supported by the Queens Museum Open A.I.R. Artist Services Program. Open A.I.R. is made possible by a generous grant from the Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund. Additional support provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.  Queens Museum Theatre

5:00-7:00pm | OPEN A.I.R. WORKSHOP

Working in Communities as Artists
Social Practice can be not only site and context-specific; it is often times also community specific. What are ways that artists can engage new communities with sensitivity? What are ways that artists and work with communities that are not their own successfully? What are things to keep in mind when working alongside communities in collaborative short-term projects or interventions? In this workshop, Noelle Ghoussani, Sukjong Hong, and Kameelah Janan Rasheed artists from The Laundromat Project will share strategies that they use when entering new communities.
Space in this workshop is limited to 30 participants. Please REGISTER HERE.
This session is generously supported by the Queens Museum Open A.I.R. Artist Services Program. Open A.I.R. is made possible by a generous grant from the Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund. Additional support provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.  
Triangle

5:30-7:00pm | The Social Lives of Artistic Property, Book Launch & Drinks
What happens when twelve artists gather to discuss the relationship between art and property? In twenty meetings over two and a half years, a core group birthed this quirky volume: Pablo Helguera, Michael Mandiberg, William Powhida, Amy Whitaker, and Caroline Woolard. We produced three pieces of writing about experiments in group living, and three proposals for the future of artistic property: studio space, living space, and artwork. We are grateful for contributions to the conversation by many others, especially Lise Soskolne and Peter Walsh, whose work is published elsewhere. Bound together here is a record of our research and an invitation to consider the forgotten histories and plausible futures of the social lives of artistic property. Studio #5, Artist Studios, Queens Museum.

7:30-9:00pm | Keynote presentation: J. Morgan Puett
Queens Museum Atrium

OFFSITE

9:00-11:00pm | Chloë Bass and Sally Szwed (with special guests TBA): FIELD TRIP: Karaoke.
FIELD TRIP: a series in five adventures is a series of off­site, thematic adventures that will introduce OE participants to eclectic local neighborhood offerings. These activities will provide an amplified social context for conversation beyond the conference format, encouraging deeper and more personal engagement with content. Limited to 18 participants. REGISTER HERE.

9:00pm | Feijoada Bang Bang: Lanchonete.org at the Sunview Luncheonette
The Sunview Luncheonette and Lanchonete.org co-host a feijoada (a traditional Brazilian Saturday meal) at The Sunview Luncheonette on the evening of May 17th as part of their respective reimagining of places of popular consumption (e.g. the lunch counter – a type of restaurant that is present in many cultures around the world) – as the basis for communal bonding, sharing, class transcendence, and mutual aid.  Hosted by Dylan Gauthier (Sunview Luncheonette) and Todd Lester (Lanchonete.org), with guest chef Thiago Carrapatoso (artist, activist, and organizer of the Baixo Centro movement in São Paulo), and additional guests TBD. OFFSITE Please RSVP to request an invite and for address: http://thesunview.org/um-feijoada/

Sunday • May 18, 2014

10:00am- 12:00pm | Parallel programming

LIFE/WORK
OurGoods.org Idea Party
Participants are divided into groups of six. Within each group, each participant is given two minutes to explain a challenge, and eight minutes of feedback. These small group brainstorm sessions are for sharing ideas and resources to meet challenges and foster a culture of support in the arts. QM Theater

The Think Tank that has yet to be named., Mapping Structures of Support
The Think Tank leads a workshop based on an ongoing project, Structures of Support, which explores how support is created & maintained. Using modified participatory design & direct action tools, participants map their individual resource networks and develop individual structures of supports. QM Theater

Theatre of the Oppressed NYC, Workshop
Participants play essential games from the arsenal of Theatre of the Oppressed & participate in a forum theatre demonstration, using these tools to investigate employment, housing, work fulfillment & human needs as they affect the NYC community. Theatrical brainstorming & radical re-imagination. Viscusi Gallery, NY Hall of Science

Alison Dean, Thinking about Movement: Helen Levitt and Street Photography
This workshop considers the role of gesture and movement in the New York street photography of Helen Levitt, drawing a line from early documentary to current practices such as Instagram. Participants will work through presentation and discussion ideas by bringing their own cameras/camera phones out into the streets. Queens Museum Triangle

PANORAMA
NOCD-NY (Naturally Occurring Cultural Districts New York), Stories of Place
Through music, dance, and video performances, Stories of Place celebrates the geographic and social diversity of the city. NOCD-NY will work with a group of artist from different NYC neighborhoods to activate the Panorama while sharing unique stories from the neighborhoods where they live and work.

IMMIGRANT INTERNATIONAL MOVEMENT
Cocina Abierta, The Break+Pausa Test Kitchen 
Cocina Abierta invites the Immigrant Movement International and Open Engagement communities to participate in a hands-on cooking demonstration, communal barbecue, and conversation about the crucial role that immigrants play in the restaurant worker movement. Please note, there is limited space in this session and sign up is required. To sign up, please follow this link to reserve a spot: https://queensmuseum.wufoo.com/forms/cocina-abierta/

OPEN PLATFORM

12:00-1:00pm | Open Platform Lectures: Education Focus

Michael Mandiberg, New York Arts Practicum
Artist and educator Michael Mandiberg will lead a talk about the New York Arts Practicum, a summer arts institute, and the larger phenomenon of para-institutional educational experiments. The talk will explore the crossover of education into socially engaged art practices.

Ariel Gentalen, It’s Still Personal: Socially Engaged Art and Feminism
It’s Still Personal: Socially Engaged Art and Feminism will be a discussion based on the problematic turn placemaking projects have taken. Highlighting the intersections of how SEA utilizes a feminist platform, we might learn from historical context and the already canonic vocabulary of feminism.

Joseph Krupczynski, UMass Amherst: Embedded Collaborations
The presentation of a joint architecture/art studio with UMass Amherst students “embedded” and collaborating with community-based organizations in the Amherst area. Using participatory, process-focused strategies the work is in dialogue with a broad range of political, economic and social contexts.
1:00- 5:00pm | Open Platform

1:00pm-1:10pm | Nina Bellisio: Sustainable Practices in Teaching Design
The goal of this presentation is to share some of the ways in which we have been able to foster students’ engagement with their communities. We will offer examples of how to raise the social consciousness in the classroom through work with environmental sustainability and local social concerns.

1:10pm-1:20pm | Matthew Mazzotta, Architecture of Social Space: Creating spaces of critique within the places we live
Matthew Mazzotta and the people of York, AL have transformed one of York’s most iconic blighted properties into a new public space. Open House is a house with a secret; it physically transforms from the shape of a house into an open-air theater that seats 100 people when its walls and roof fold down.

1:20pm-1:30pm | Interference Archive: An Archive From Below
Interference Archive, a collectively run Brooklyn-based social movement archive, will give a presentation about the space and how it has grown since opening in 2011, as well as the struggles and successes of running an “archive from below.”

1:30pm-1:40pm | Claire Sabel, Come As We Are
Come As We Are is a grassroots feminist group based in Brooklyn. In this presentation, we will discuss grassroots feminist sex education, including some of our tactics and those of similar groups. We will also discuss our approach to including aesthetics and art into our activist practice.

1:40pm-1:50pm | Sandra de la Loza, The Pocho Research Society of Erased and Invisible History
Working at the intersection of art and activism, de la Loza will reflect on her journey as an artist who approaches art as a process of decolonization. She will share her struggles and strategies toward fostering agency inside and outside institutional spaces.

1:50pm-2:00pm | Neda Mordipour, Louder Than Words: I CAN WE CAN
I CAN WE CAN is a socially engaged art project created to strengthen, connect and expand the community united to end domestic violence and sexual assault. This ongoing participatory art project has engaged over 10,000 participants throughout Los Angeles and from as far away as Iran and Australia.

2:00pm-2:10pm | Laura Sandow, Declassified: Stories of Two Women Working in Guantanamo
Declassified: Stories of Two Women Working in Guantanamo originally appeared in Symbolia Magazine (Symboliamag.com), an online magazine, in June 2013 and is now available in print. In “Declassified” Laura Sandow, a U.S. Navy veteran that served in Guantanamo Bay when the first detainees were sent to Camp X-Ray in January 2002 and a friend that served with her, share their stories of service in Guantanamo and some of the challenges that they faced personally and professionally. This project was a collaboration including Laura and her friend “Melanie”, writer/editor Sarah Mirk and illustrator Lucy Bellwood.

2:10pm-2:20pm | Carol Stakenas, SPAN: Power of the People
For many the “power of the people” is lost. Through The boundaries between government, business and civil society have been blurred to such an extent that for many the “power of the people” is lost. Citizen movements organizing around HIV/AIDS, anti-fracking and climate change indicate there is potential, but that we need more practice for life-long engagement as these issues escalate exponentially. (SPAN) will highlight projects by Public Lab, Pato Hebert and Marina Zurkow. Through creative action, advocacy and technology each “together work” project connects people with one another to experience both the urgency and the impact of sustained collective action.

3:20pm-3:30pm | Susannah Tantemsapya, Creative Migration: Creative Sustainability
Creative Migration curates a panel discussion on how creative fields can practice and encourage sustainability. This includes a screening of POST NEW BILLS, a short documentary that releases in January 2014 as a part of a two-year traveling Green Patriot Posters exhibition with Design Museum Boston.

3:30pm-3:40pm | James McAnally: I am for an artist who vanishes?
I am for an artist who vanishes is a presentation that takes Claes Oldenburg’s 1961 manifesto and recent developments in participatory art as a jumping off point to explore the collective life of art as it leaves the CV of the artist and enters a broader field.

3:40pm-3:50pm | Jay Erker, Invitation to Collaborate: Art Work
A presentation of images and video from “Invitation to Collaborate: Art Work” which took place on a Facebook event page from June to August 2013. Jay Erker would also like to offer instructions to conference attendees for subtle actions/performances to be performed.

3:50pm-4:00pm | Jessica Cochran, Columbia College Chicago: Social Paper, Social Practice
Social Paper, Social Practice will address the curatorial research and production of Social Paper, the first exhibition to consider the art of hand papermaking as socially engaged art. How were we able to generate new discourse, while asserting the relevance of the resurgence of this practice?

4:00pm-4:10pm | Piero Passacantando, MyNerva
MyNerva is a collaborative center for artistic research an dialogue exploring the corporate office. For OE, MyNerva will coordinate a discussion on the topic of freedom in the context of the corporate office. This discussion will follow a trajectory from personal to communal conceptions of freedom.

4:10pm-4:20pm | Adam Horowitz, US Department of Art and Culture
The US Department of Arts and Culture is the nation’s newest people-powered department. Radically inclusive, useful and sustainable, and vibrantly playful, the USDAC aims to engage thousands in creating a world rooted in empathy, equity, and social imagination. Join the act of collective imagination; step up as a cultural agent today! The Deputy Secretary of the USDAC will be on-site with a participatory performance exploring the beginnings and possible future of the nation’s newest people-powered department. How might we ignite a movement for cultural democracy? All are invited to take part in this act of collective imagination.

4:20pm-4:30pm | Aliya Bonar, PowerSuits
“PowerSuits” explores individuals’ relationships to power and confidence in their daily lives through costume. My presentation reflects on past versions of the project – including an intergenerational camp with Girl Scouts and a NY Fashion Week pop-up shop – and look towards what’s next.

4:30pm-4:40pm | Deana Haggag and Ginevra Shay, The Contemporary: Audience is Everywhere
The Contemporary is a nomadic art museum that commissions projects and programming that define a “new public,” one where audience is everywhere.The museum is invested in interconnectivity and committed to social responsibility in order to dismantle “passive engagement” and promote ‘actual inclusion.’

4:40pm-4:50pm | Samantha Fein, Ghetto Biennale
Haitian art collective Atiz-Rezistans transformed their impoverished Port-au-Prince neighborhood by fabricating monumental sculptures from refuse. Atiz-Rezistans also organizes the Ghetto Biennale, during which international artists come to Haiti to create collaborative projects on site.

4:50pm-5:00pm | Extremely Luminous Productions: This Lane Doesn’t Exist
Extremely Luminous Productions proposes to screen footage from the upcoming documentary film ‘This Lane Doesn’t Exist’. Recorded at last year’s Open Engagement 2013, the film explores what socially engaged art is and how it can empower people and create real change in the world.

12:30-2:00pm | Lunchtime Conversation Series
Please note, there are limited spaces in the Lunch Discussion Series sessions and sign up is required. To sign up, please follow this link to reserve a spot:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/oe-2014-lunchtime-conversation-series-tickets-11006732433

Gregory Sholette
The global economic crisis and socially engaged art’s anti-capitalist impulse.

The political economy of art is under increasing scrutiny following the global financial meltdown and pushback from a recently awakened “one percent.” We are  now faced with two competing scenarios, both equally difficult to realize, and both with their own particular hopes and drawbacks. One course of events finds us striving to monetize our practices by seeking remuneration for artistic labor. The other requires formulating loopholes that will somehow compromise the smooth surface of the cultural marketplace by opening up spaces in which an entirely different form of cultural production and interactivity can take place. Join us to eat, discuss and debate these contrasting visions of socially engaged artistic practice, and perhaps attempt to imagine other possibilities that fall between or outside these binaries. Queens Museum Theater

Erica Thomas: Whatʼs Mine is Yours: Labor, Participation, and Generosity in Feminist Art/Life Practices
How does your life affect your work, and your work affect your life? How do you spend your time? How do you earn a living? Who do you work for? Who do you collaborate with? How do you value your work? How can we best support each other’s practices? Gather for a facilitated conversation on women’s labor and participation in the arts followed by an opportunity swap. We all have something to offer and something to gain. Triangle Room in the Artist Studios Area, Queens Museum

Maya Valladares and Michelle Hagewood
Life/Work of Teaching Artists

This lunchtime conversation will invite participants to discuss the life/work of teaching artists, or artists who teach. The conversation will focus on three primary questions:  What are the skills that emerge from the dual practice of teaching and art making? How can these skills be leveraged to create sustainable communities of practice?  And what existing or non-existing resources can we compile and align with to best support the work? Viscusi Gallery 1, NY Hall of Science

Sara Reisman
Public Art as Mirror
Does public art need to be a reflection of the community where it is sited? How do the stakes and expectations for community inclusion differ between short term and long-term/permanent artwork? The title of this conversation conjures Mierle Ukeles’ “Social Mirror” (1983) in which the public could see its own reflection in the mirrored surface of a sanitation truck. From the use of mirrors as a device for inclusion in public art to the expectation that public art serves as a reflection of the surrounding community, this conversation is an opportunity to ask awkward questions about representation in public and community-based artwork. Lab 2, NY Hall of Science

Chelsea Haines
Making It Work: Strategies for Exhibiting Socially Engaged Art
This workshop takes up the idea that current enthusiasm for socially engaged art relates as much (if not more) to rise in public reception as increased artistic production. The challenge of this new institutional embrace lies in how exhibitions can be reductive—if not antithetical—to socially engaged art. Can socially engaged art maintain agency within the museum? Is it possible to produce exhibitions that allow for dissent? How can we stop thinking of gallery visitors as “secondary audiences” to a project? Creative workers of all kinds are invited to discuss case studies looking at how socially engaged art is presented today. Viscusi Gallery 2, Hall of Science

Paul Ramirez Jonas & Marina McDougall
Imagining Infrastructure
This will be an informal conversation between Marina McDougall, Director of the Center for Art & Inquiry at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, and Paul Ramirez Jonas an artist based in Brooklyn. They will be discussing the often invisible effect that collaborative socially engaged projects can have on the people and institutions that come together to realize them. Can the background effect of a collaboration, imagining and realizing new support systems, be as important as what is usually foregrounded? Werwaiss Gallery

Sheetal Prajapati 
Getting Personal: Fostering Creative Collaborative Spaces
What conditions must exist to develop a creative synergy between artists and the institutions they collaborate with? What framework allows institutions and artists to develop a public projects together, as partners in the creative process? This lunchtime conversation will examine the critical role the “personal” plays in creating conditions for successful long-term collaborations between artists and organizations. Lab 4, NY Hall of Science

Amy Sananman-Groundswell
Public Work; Private Lives
Groundswell Executive Director Amy Sananman moderates an intimate conversation with artists KET, Katie Yamasaki and Esteban del Valle, which explores the challenges and possibility of creating artwork in public. In this discussion, a selection of public artists will explore the tension and possibility of creating public work while living private lives. The conversation will invite reflection on the ethos of Life/Work, asking: What is the role of privacy in the creative process? Is there a part of your work or life that you wished you never made public? How does the phenomenon of crowd-sourcing and social media inform your artistic process? What was it like to make art in public before the internet?  Education Studio A, Queens Museum

Yael Filipovic and  Kristelle Holliday
Intimate Aspirations

What is the role of the connections, relationships and friendships one makes through the creation of socially engaged art? Does one recognize the value of these vital relationships as an important end-goal in itself? Artists and cultural workers are privileged in that their work enables to create change. In order to attain this goal, they utilize methodologies that are centered on building and attaining trust between the artist and the participant, public, or collaborator. This trust is the basis of what can become a series of strong individual relationships. It can be argued that the strength of these relationships is directly linked to the success and/or outcome of a project. Considering the affection, loyalty and integrity that result from such exchanges, can we recognize these vital relationships as an end-goal in themselves? This lunchtime discussion will explore the role and place of relationship-making within the creative process. Black Box Theater 1, Queens Theatre in the Park

Tattfoo Tan
From Staten Island to Queens
Artist Tattfoo Tan invited 5 guests to stay with him in Staten Island and travel together to Open Engagement over the last two days, a long journey that can take up to two hours from Staten Island to Queens. This process is an endurance in duration allows guests to get to know Tan’s practice in-depth and investigate why artists and art venues are being pushed to the boundaries of the city.  This lunchtime talk will include Tattfoo and the project participants reflecting on their experience over the course of the conference. Black Box Theater 2, Queens Theatre in the Park

Carmen Papalia
Bodies of Knowledge: Open Sourcing Disability Experience
This lunchtime conversation is a roundtable discussion that brings together 6 artists and curators, including: Amanda Cachia, Carmen Papalia, Trina Rose, Laura Swanson, Sunaura Taylor and Sandie Yi, who, through their work, open disability experience and disabled embodiment as a liberatory space and nuanced way of knowing the world. Viscusi Gallery 3, Hall of Science

OFFSITE

12:30-2:00pm | Chloë Bass and Sally Szwed (with special guests TBA): FIELD TRIP: Lunch at the Flushing Food Court.
FIELD TRIP: a series in five adventures is a series of off­site, thematic adventures that will introduce OE participants to eclectic local neighborhood offerings. These activities will provide an amplified social context for conversation beyond the conference format, encouraging deeper and more personal engagement with content. Limited to 16 participants. REGISTER HERE.

1:00-2:00 | Wayfinding: 100 NYC Public Sculptures Installation Tour, Bundith Phunsombatlert

Grab lunch and meet Thai artist Bundith Phunsombatlert who will introduce his installation Wayfinding: 100 NYC Public Sculptures immediately outside the Queens Museum.  The installation is composed of 100 directional signs, each with a drawing of a public sculpture in NYC and the distance (mapped with GPS coordinates) between the source- sculpture and the sign. Viewers participate in this project by experiencing each sculpture, whether through the original works or their representational drawn counterparts, calling attention to the very specific, transformative space between object and audience. Artist will lead those interested to see some public sculptures in Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

2:30-4:30pm | Parallel programming

LIFE/WORK
Civic Life & Socially Engaged Art
How can approaches to socially engaged art impact civic life? How can cities work with artists to  shape their cities? How can socially engaged art create cultural exchange? This session  brings together Edgar Arceneaux and Kevin Krapf,  the City of Ottawa, and Marcus Young. Can socially based art create models for equitable engagement between the US and foreign nations? Edgar Arceneaux and Kevin Krapf will present their ongoing effort Three Million Years, a socially engaged art project that has established tangible country-to-country cultural ties in Sao Tome, Africa.

From the perspective of the public service in the City of Ottawa, Caleb Abbott & Allison O’Connor will discuss Social Practice principles in municipal programs as it relates to their program Community Arts & Social Engagement. Marcus Young will discuss city art and behavioral art–dancing in the streets, living in a museum, and working in a public works department. He will also reflect on what Mierle Laderman Ukeles said to him when they first met in 2007: “Are we the only two in our species?” QM Theater

Artists in/as Institutions
This panel brings together Brett Hunter, City Artist-in-residence, and Institute for New Feeling to share their perspectives on institutions by/with artists. For City-Artist-in-residence,  ‘Institutionally-engaged’ artists suspend their autonomy in order to inhabit the political and practical power enabled by the institution. This complex body of practice maintains it’s critical stance – that complicity and collaboration do not undermine criticality. Hunter asks, “Are we active citizens in our local communities?” he will focus on a discussion of innovative artists and collectives working within the context of local community institutions, creating partnerships between institutions, or forming their own institutions in the places they live. The Institute for New Feeling (IfNf) is an artist collective that functions as an experimental “wellness” institution, offering unconventional treatments, therapies and retreats. Currently a migrant performance series led by Scott Andrew, Agnes Bolt and Nina Sarnelle, IfNf plans to open a storefront spa in Los Angeles. Viscusi Gallery, NY Hall of Science

PANORAMA
Nick Tobier, City of Carts
City of Carts leverages the micro-infrastructure of NYC food vending carts—from hot dogs to buttered rolls—projecting future uses for a fleet of iconic vehicles on a citywide scale by proposing imaginative visions for the social lives of our street corners alongside utilitarian networks

WATERSHED
Mary Miss, City as Living Laboratory
A dialogue between artists Mary Miss, Eve Mosher, designer, Elliott Maltby, and environmental engineer Franco Montalto around how the arts and design can help make communities more aware of the sources of their water and the dynamic realities and risks inherent in the New York watershed.

 

OTHER
Socially Engaged Art Student Summit
Tea-brief
Institutions have been adopting MFA programs in socially engaged art. Students at these programs have been criticized as clueless white kids who have no background or analysis around the work they do. This is reductive. Students from around the country are coming together in conversation to shed light on what the next wave of socially engaged art looks like. Who are socially engaged art students? What are they doing? Why? What besides debt are they getting from their education? These questions and more will be raised by students themselves, addressed through installation, lunch conversation, and a conference ”tea-brief.” Queens Museum Triangle

5:00pm-6:00pm | WOOLOO & KIDS: NYC A.D. 3014
Parallel to the adult discussions at the center of Open Engagement, Danish art collective Wooloo will be playing through the weekend with the kids of conference attendees. Together we will imagine and create a New York City of the year 3014. We invite you to visit the future. Education Workshop, 2nd Floor, Queens Museum.

6:00pm-7:00pm | /rive collective, COMMotion Tour

Artists Samara Smith, Karen Oh and A.E. Souzis from the /rive collective will give a short guided tour of COMMotion, their augmented reality project exploring NYC through the lens of the daily commute.  Panorama.

5:00-6:30pm | OPEN A.I.R. WORKSHOP

Curating for Socially Engaged Art

What are the considerations for curating social practice? How does the role of the curator shift in these practices? How are artists and curators working together within institutions and beyond to support these ways of working? What is the role of curator in social movements? This panel will delve into these questions and more. In a conversation moderated by Prerana Reddy, Bill Kelley Jr., Josh MacPhee and Erin Sickler will share practical strategies and personal accounts of curating for social practice. This session is generously supported by the Queens Museum Open A.I.R. Artist Services Program. Open A.I.R. is made possible by a generous grant from the Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund. Additional support provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.  Queens Museum Theater

5:00-7:00pm | OPEN A.I.R. WORKSHOP

Introduction to Cultural and Community Organizing

What are the ways that we can build social movements and advocate for social justice through cultural work? How does social practice fit into it? What are strategies and tools artists can use when engaging with a community on a long-term project? In this workshop Cultural and Community Organizers Alexandra Garcia, Lucas Sanchez and NOCD (NATURALLY OCCURRING CULTURAL DISTRICTS GROUP)  will share strategies artists can use when planning to engage in a long-term collaborative project with a specific community. This workshop will be bilingual and simultaneous interpretation will be provided. Space in this workshop is limited to 30 participants. Preference will be given to women, people of color and queer individuals. Please REGISTER HERE. This session is generously supported by the Queens Museum Open A.I.R. Artist Services Program. Open A.I.R. is made possible by a generous grant from the Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund. Additional support provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.  Queens Museum Triangle

7:30pm-9:00pm | Keynote Presentation: Mierle Laderman Ukeles
Queens Museum Atrium

9:00pm-11:00pm | Post-conference mixer with WORDS ON WALLS, Immigrant Vinyl, and Social Capital auction.

WORDS ON WALLS

Urban Word NYC, along with partners City Lore and Bowery Arts & Science present the culminating performance from their WORDS ON WALLS program. WORDS ON WALLS is a collaborative performance of music and spoken word by NYC teens, this year responding to OE2014 themes. Accompanying the performers, poetry will be projected onto the exterior of the Queens Museum by the POEMobile, a beautifully hand-painted truck covered in the calligraphy of multilingual poetry that houses an innovative, open-air text projection system. 9-10pm

Immigrant Vinyl, Sol Aramendi
The Vinyl Social will transform the QM atrium into a space for social encounters and interactions around music.  Visitors can look through records of music mostly brought to the U.S. by immigrants, and then can choose a song to put on the Open Turntables. Vinyl Social is part of a series of works by artist Sol Aramendi created in response to our sterile relationship with media in the digital age.

Zachary Gough, Social Capital Auction, Exchange Rate: Bordieux, a Social Capital Currency
This currency serves as a medium of exchange for social capital between the participants at OE. It financializes and makes visible an existing gift economy to challenge practitioners to question the origins of their own social capital bankroll. Queens Museum Atrium

Ongoing

Barrie Cline with Art Workers Collective and Sol Aramendi with Project Luz
The Workers Pavilion and Migrant Camera

The Workers Pavilion and Migrant Camera engage union trades people and immigrant workers to collectively design and build an LED lit, labor -themed exhibition structure/sculpture and a nomadic walk-in camera obscura that will take the form of a workers shanty in storied Flushing Meadow Corona Park. Flushing Meadow Corona Park

Barona
To begin a conversation about Barona’s transdisciplinary approach to healthcare, we are driving a school bus across the country. Barona would like to extend and expand upon this conversation with people at the conference by parking the bus outside of the museum, to dialogue with attendees. Queens Museum Parking Lot

Chloë Bass and Sally Szwed, Field Trip
A series of off-site, thematic adventures that will introduce OE participants to eclectic local neighborhood offerings. These activities will provide an amplified social context for conversation beyond the conference format, encouraging deeper and more personal engagement with content. Offsite

Lisa Ciccarello and Steve Leathers, Are You Your Work
Are You Your Work explores the personal relationships individuals feel to their “work” in a public setting, elevating private musings on the subject of self & work into a public conversation.  Are You Your Work asks participants to think about whether they are or are not more than the work that they do, then to formulate a micro essay about their convictions. These essays will be displayed during the conference in order to facilitate a larger conversation about our collective beliefs. The essays will also be fed to a twitter account, so as to be accessible to people not attending the conference & archived for future consideration. Location TBD

The Federation of Message Sayers: Send a Message Sayer
“SEND A MESSAGE SAYER” during Open Engagement. A message sayer is a go-between, a relay agent who delivers spoken messages as part of a human-mediated communications network. Schedule a 10-15 minute conversation with a message sayer to begin a message and rehearse possible meanings. Then, send the message sayer to converse with your intended recipient. A message sayer embodies the space of meaning, emphasizing slowness, to ensure artisanal attention to the co-constructed message and its affective quality. Message sayers will be available at indicated presentations and a designated saying station. If interested, ask about becoming a message sayer yourself… OE Registration Area & All Conference Locations

FLUSH/MEAD/COR/PAR: FMCP Pavilion
The FMCP PAVILION is a physical and discursive space dedicated to the future of Flushing Meadows Corona Park. It aims to create interest and new ideas for the Queens park by exhibiting the work of several community-based research teams. A series of forums and workshops will be initiated from here. Flushing Meadow Corona Park

Zachary Gough: Exchange Rate: Bordieux, a Social Capital Currency
This currency serves as a medium of exchange for social capital between the participants at OE. It financializes and makes visible an existing gift economy to challenge practitioners to question the origins of their own social capital bankroll. OE Registration Area & All Conference Locations

Alicia Grullon: Three-one-one/El Tres-uno-uno
With the artist’s assistance, local residents and visitors will be encouraged to make 311 calls on-site about neighborhood problems (environmental, structural, social, etc.) needing improvement. The artist will set up a small portable stand and move throughout the Corona area near the museum. Various locations

Guestwork, Do You Make a Living Wage: I Buy Things Everyday
Do You Make a Living Wage: I Buy Things Everyday is a social prompt and conference tote bag intervention. GUESTWORK is collaborating closely with Mobile Print Power to host a day of screen printing in which conference attendees can have the phrase “Do You Make  A Living Wage?” printed on their tote bags. The tote bag can then be used as prompt to engage in conversations around socio-economics at the check-out. Flushing Meadow Corona Park / Mobile Print Power

Gustavson & Keeling,  Love-Seats
A series of office chair-loveseats: functional sculptures with a hybrid design to suggest the possibility of sharing an object originally intended for solitary, work-oriented use. Utilizing the loveseats creates a space where OE attendees may engage with one another and the surrounding works. OE Registration Area

Laura Hadden and Tennessee Watson: Wage/Working
Wage/Working is a community-based oral history project addressing the issue of income inequality and the concept of wage. Stories from workers are gathered and edited to a length which corresponds with the amount of time it takes them to earn $1, then placed inside a jukebox hosted in the community. OE Registration Area

Elyse Mallouk, Landfill Quarterly: The Shift
Since 2010, Landfill Quarterly’s online archive has chronicled ephemera produced by socially engaged projects. The print publication, which redistributes selected objects along with a journal containing interviews and project descriptions, celebrates its re-launch at this year’s Open Engagement with the release of Issue 4: The Shift. The issue features projects on and about work, and is available for perusal in a reading area near registration. Modeled after a museum office space (complete with office plants borrowed from Queens Museum staff), the desk also offers access to back issues and the online archive. OE Registration Area

Mobile Print Power: Tote Bag Intervention
Mobile Print Power will host a weekend of silkscreen printmaking on the walkway that surrounds the Unisphere. Activities will include a Tote Bag Intervention in collaboration with artists Travis Neel and Erin Charpentier. This fun and engaging project will explore the work/life theme and demonstrate how Mobile Print Power provides a unique model for socially cooperative art practice. Flushing Meadow Corona Park

Ping Pong Diplomacy
Hosted by the Queens Museum 
On weekends at the Queens Museum it is not uncommon to see Director Tom Finkelpearl set up at the museum playing ping pong with visitors. This is just one of the ways he engages in dialogues with the public about the institution. As an extension of this practice, Tom Finkelpearl and members of the Open Engagement team will be engaging in games of ping pong with conference presenters and attendees throughout the weekend. Stop by and talk to us! The ping pong table will be set up throughout the conference in various locations around the Queens Museum.

The Socially Engaged Art Student Summit
Institutions have been adopting MFA programs in socially engaged art. Students at these programs have been criticized as clueless white kids who have no background or analysis around the work they do. This is reductive. Students from around the country are coming together in conversation to shed light on what the next wave of socially engaged art looks like. Who are socially engaged art students? What are they doing? Why? What besides debt are they getting from their education? These questions and more will be raised by students themselves, addressed through installation, lunch conversation, and a conference “tea-brief”. Various locations.

TRYST, Assisted Street Crossing
In Assisted Street Crossing (ASC), lifters offer pedestrians a literal lift across the street. In ASC: OE, lifters, recruited from conference attendees and local participants, would intervene in conference traffic to establish a new kind of work relationship to interrogate relating within a conference environment. Various locations

Wooloo, Human Hotel & Art Camp
Wooloo’s Human Hotel in NYC provides free private housing for visiting cultural workers traveling with children. During Open Engagement 2014, the Human Hotel project will accommodate out-of-town presenters traveling with children in the homes of private New Yorkers. Additionally, Wooloo, in collaboration with Queens Museum staff, will organize and personally run an art camp at the Museum open to all conference attendees with children aged 4-12. Wooloo’s contribution to Open Engagement 2014 addresses a primary need at the conference, as well as explores the ways in which areas of support and cooperation are essential to allow for structures of full participation in society.

/rive collective
COMMotion

COMMotion, an augmented reality tour set in the Queens Museum’s Panorama, examines NYC through the lens of the daily commute. Participants will hold up smartphones or tablets at spots around the Panorama to see the maps of individual commutes laid over the model of New York City. These documentary maps, based on input from communities across the five boroughs, tell the stories of individual commuters and begin to sketch a larger narrative of transition, raising questions about what the city is, what it is becoming and what it could be.

Conference Presenters

In Progress:

Alberto Aguilar
Sol Aramendi
Edgar Arceneaux
Maximilian Auffhammer
Jennifer Armbrust
Marnie Badham
Barona
Chloë Bass
Crystal Baxley
Nina Bellisio
Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts (Amanda McDonald Crowley)
Robert Blackson
Brooklyn Hi Art Machine (Mildred Beltré and Oasa DuVerney)
Michael G. Birchall
Aliya Bonar
Kristin Fleischmann Brewer
Pete Brook
Bibi Calderaro
Thiago Carrapatoso
Lisa Ciccarello
‘City Artist-in-residence’
City of Ottawa
Barrie Cline
Cocina Abierta (Christina Sanchez, Cayetano Juarez and Oakland Bautista)
Jessica Cochran
Michelle Coffey
Maureen Connor
Kari Conte
The Contemporary
Come As We Are
Taryn Cowart
Creative Migration
Laura Curry
Sonya Darrow
Alison Dean
Sandra de la Loza
Stephanie Diamond
Juliana Driever
Adeola Enigbokan
Emily Ensminger
Jay Erker
Wendy Ewald
Extremely Luminous Productions
Sarah Farahat
The Federation of Message Sayers (Dillon de Give and Matt Carlson)
Samantha Fein
Letitia Fernandez Ivins
Yael Filipovic
Matthew Finn
Kristelle Holliday
Tom Finkelpearl
Deborah Fisher
FLUSH/MEAD/COR/PAR (Francisco Karmelic, Jose Serrano-McClain, and Vito Acconci)
Matthew Friday
Alexandra Garcia
Ariel Gentalen
Green Map System
Dylan Gauthier
Noelle Ghoussani
Zachary Gough
Alicia Grullon
Guernica
Guestwork (Erin Charpentier and Travis Neel)
Melinda Guillen
Claire Gustavson
Laura Hadden
Michelle Hagewood
Chelsea Haines
Pablo Helguera
Jon Henry
Szu-Han Ho
Sukjong Hong
Christopher Howard
John Hulsey
Alana Hunt
Brett Hunter
Institute for New Feeling (IfNf)
Interference Archive (IA)
Ariana Jacob
Arthur Jafa
Anna Lise Jensen
Megan Johnston
Sarah Keeling
Bill Kelley, Jr
Bernard Klevickas
Daniel Koff
Kevin Krapf
Joseph Krupczynski
Mierle Laderman Ukeles
Nicole Lattuca
The Laundromat Project
Steve Leathers
Todd Lester
Louder Than Words
Josh MacPhee
Elyse Mallouk
Elliot Maltby
Michael Mandiberg
Betty Marín
Manuel Martagon
Marc Mayer
Matthew Mazzotta
James McAnally
Marina McDougall
Tim Miller
Mary Miss
Meta Local (Elizabeth Hamby and Hatuey Ramos-Fermín)
Mobile Print Power
Elissa Blount Moorhead
Eve Mosher
John Muse
Laura Napier
The Newtown Creek Armada (Laura Chipley, Nathan Kensinger, and Sarah Nelson Wright)
NOCD-NY
OurGoods.org
Carmen Papalia
Piero Passacantando
Partnerships for Parks (PfP)
The Pedagogy Group
Sheetal Prajapati
‘The Projects’
J. Morgan Puett
Paul Ramirez Jonas
Stefan Ransom
Kameelah Janan Rasheed
Prerana Reddy
Judilee Reed
Sara Reisman
Regeneración Childcare NYC
REV- (Marisa Jahn )
/rive
Lucas Sanchez
Laura Sandow
Abigail Satinsky
Jose Serrano-McClain
Colleen Sheehy
Bonnie Ora Sherk
Craig Shillitto
Gregory Sholette
Erin Sickler
Helen Smith
The Socially Engaged Art Student Summit
Social Practices Art Network (Jules Rochielle and Carol A. Stakenas)
Amy Spiers
Ellen Staller
Mark Strandquist
SUMPTUARY
Sally Szwed
Tattfoo Tan
The Think Tank that has yet to be named.
Theatre of the Oppressed NYC
Erica Meryl Thomas
Nato Thompson
Nick Tobier
Edwin Torres
TRYST
Gemma-Rose Turnbull
Urban Word NYC
The US Department of Arts and Culture
Maya Valladares
Patricia Vazquez
Linda Weintraub
Freddie Wills
Jody Wood
Caroline Woolard
Wooloo
Marcus Young